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KMT: Ruling and Opposition Parties Should Be One on NPM Issue

icon2014/06/24
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 News Release

 
KMT: Ruling and Opposition Parties Should Be One on NPM Issue
 
KMT Cultural and Communications Committee
 
June 24, 2014
 
 
The Taipei-based National Palace Museum (NPM; 國立故宮博物院) is scheduled to exhibit a collection of its treasures at the Tokyo National Museum and the Kyushu National Museum in Japan from June 24 to September 15. However, posters displayed throughout Japan have violated the exhibition contract by omitting the key word “National” in “National Palace Museum,” leading to a strong protest from Taiwan.  Before the Tokyo National Museum issued a formal apology, some figures of the opposition party criticized the government’s response to the misprinted promotional materials.  KMT spokesman Charles Chen (陳以信), on June 23, stated that the ruling and opposition parties should come together at this moment to strive for our country’s dignity instead of engaging in infighting within the country.  Chen went on to say that the opposition party should not oppose for the sake of opposing or instigate to harm the relations between Taiwan and Japan.
 
Chen pointed out that it was a critical juncture to negotiate with Japan and everyone in Taiwan should come together.  Chen said that until the Tokyo National Museum made a formal apology, we should remain united.  Chen criticized that some figures of the opposition party and Japanophiles did not know the importance of solidarity and even criticized the government over the issue of the country’s dignity.  Chen added that such figures had not blamed the Tokyo National Museum, adding that their fawning attitude was intolerable.
 
Chen stated that the government always insisted on three principles, i.e., a rational attitude, a firm stance, and strong countermeasures, in dealing with the NPM issue.  
 
Chen stated that the government respected the exhibition contract on the one hand, and insisted on defending our country’s dignity on the other hand.  Chen added that the government fought for the fairness and justice that our country deserved.
 
Chen stressed that President Ma Ying-jeou always upheld our country’s integrity by maintaining consistent stance on dealing with foreign affairs.  Chen stated that President Ma’s stance remained unchanged in the face of the “Kuang Ta Hsing No. 28”incident (廣大興28號) with the Philippines and the dispute over the Diaoyutai Islands with Japan.   
 
Chen hoped that DPP Chairperson Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) would not employ double standards in criticizing the government and defending country’s sovereignty.  Chen pointed out that the government remained consistent in defending our country’s dignity.  Chen stated that DPP Chairperson Tsai and DPP members should ask themselves when the DPP had fought for the interests of Taiwan in disputes of sovereignty over the Diaoyutai Islands with Japan.   Chen added that the DPP made an abrupt about-face when facing Japan over our country’s dignity.
 
【Editor’s note:  On September 8, 2012, DPP spokesperson Lin Chun-hsien stated that the DPP, of course, supported defending sovereignty over the Diaoyutai Islands, but the real administrator of the Diaoyutai Islands was Japan.  Lin added that the principle of the then DPP administration was to safeguard our fishermen and jointly explore maritime resources as a top priority and avoid disputes over sovereignty on the basis of international realities.  Lin went on to say that, however, the Ma administration had escalated the dispute to the level of sovereignty, so the DPP called on all parties involved to seek a peaceful resolution of the Diaoyutai Islands issue.】    
 
   
 

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